Last edited by Shakamuro
Thursday, November 19, 2020 | History

7 edition of Looking like the enemy found in the catalog.

Looking like the enemy

  • 91 Want to read
  • 35 Currently reading

Published by NewSage Press in Troutdale, Or .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gruenewald, Mary Matsuda, 1925-,
  • Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945,
  • Japanese Americans -- Biography

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references.

    Statementby Mary Matsuda Gruenewald.
    GenreBiography.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsD769.8.A5 G78 2005
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL3393683M
    ISBN 100939165538
    LC Control Number2005004076
    OCLC/WorldCa57652354

      Book Review: Looking Like the Enemy: Japanese Mexicans, the Mexican State, and US Hegemony, by Jerry García By Yuichiro Onishi / 3 Feb At the heart of Jerry García’s book is an analysis of the experience of Japanese Mexicans during World War II. Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps by Gruenewald, Mary Matsuda and a great selection of related .


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Looking like the enemy by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald Download PDF EPUB FB2

Ina Young Reader's edition of Mary's memoir, Looking Like the Enemy, was published by NewSage Press. Writer and editor, Maureen R. Michelson, worked closely with Mary to adapt her book for young readers just learning about World War II and.

Heartbreaking and insightful, "Looking Like the Enemy" is a book that deserves to be read by every American so that the crime that was committed during World War II might not be committed again. It should be included on every High School reading list.

Read more. 6 people found this by: 3. Nothing short of utterly shocking, Looking Like the Enemy is a reminder of a very dark time in world history, and why time and time again we're in danger of repeating it every time we judge a person for their race, religion or ethnicity and not by their actions or character as human beings.

In an age where the Holocaust and Pearl Harbour were haunting the nightmares of many, it was easy to /5. Heartbreaking and insightful, "Looking Like the Enemy" is a book that deserves to be read by every American so that the crime that was committed during World War II might not be committed again.

It should be included on every High School reading list. Read more. 6 people found this helpful/5(85). ESSAY: AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE Harry Latirofian 07/SP_CORE__22 The Global Challenge An Enemy of the people is a drama filled with ethical dilemmas and issues that are largely were caused by the contrasts between the Stockmann brothers.

Thomas Stockmann is jovial by nature and likes to be surrounded by people like him that are intelligent and hard working. Mary Matsuda Gruenewald, Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps 1.

Why are interned Japanese Americans referred to as the “silent generation” (p. They were referred to as the silent generation because many of them did not speak about their experiences to anyone, not even their children after their times in.

Densho is a Japanese term meaning “to pass on to the next generation,” or to leave a legacy. The legacy we offer is an American story with ongoing relevance: during World War II, the United States government incarcerated innocent people solely because of their ancestry. Looking Like the Enemy is the first English-language book to report on the Japanese experience in Mexico.

It is an important examination of the tumultuous half-century before World War II, offering illuminating insights into the wartime experiences of the Japanese on both sides of the US/Mexico border. When I pulled Looking Like The Enemy off of the bookshelf at my parents’ place, I didn’t know what to expect.

I’ve read a ‘few’ books about the internment experience as I am always looking for new ways to ‘see’ the Looking like the enemy book experience, which begins with a complex mash of cultures, politics and economic circumstances that were beyond.

“Looking Like the Enemy takes on topics including whiteness, revolution, modernity, and identity politics. The book engages with a broad historiography [and] is a strong addition to a growing literature on Latin Americans of immigrant descent.”—Hispanic American Historical Review.

Looking Like the Enemy My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps by Mary Mat Gruenewald available in Trade Paperback onalso read synopsis and reviews.

InMary Matsuda Gruenewald was a teenage girl. Looking Like the Enemy is the first English-language history of the Japanese experience in Mexico. Japanese citizens were initially lured to Mexico with promises of cheap and productive land in Chiapas.

Many of the promises were false, and the immigrants were forced to fan out across the country, especially to the lands along the US border. When I went looking for another place to sit, I found one on the top bunk of a sleeper car. There were many girls sprawled up there, none of whom I knew.

One of the tall, good looking soldiers laughingly said to us as he walked down the aisle, “Hey, why don’t some of. Looking Like the Enemy book. Read 6 reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Mary Matsuda is a typical year-old girl living on Vashon I /5. Get this from a library.

Looking like the enemy: my story of imprisonment in Japanese-American internment camps. [Mary Matsuda Gruenewald] -- "When Mary Matsuda Gruenewald was seventeen years old she and her family were evacuated to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, along with nearlyother people of Japanese ancestry.

Densho historical video of the aftermath of the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Learn more at Funding for this video was provided, in part, by an aw. Mary Matsuda Gruenewald talked about her memoir Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps, published.

Looking Like the Enemy is a not-to-be forgotten book. I savored every word and image as I tried to imagine how I would feel in Mary's Matsuda's shoes as a teenager imprisoned by her own government simply because of her parent's ancestry. Book Summary: The title of this book is Looking Like the Enemy and it was written by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald.

This particular edition is in a Paperback format. This books publish date is and it has a suggested retail price of $ It was published by NewSage Press and has a total of pages in the book. Looking Like the Enemy My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese-American Internment Camps (Book): Gruenewald, Mary Matsuda: Mary Matsuda was only 16 years old when her family was ordered to leave their home on Vashon Island.

They were sent to California's Tule Lake Internment Camp. Mary Matsuda Gruenewald shares her family's amazing story of survival and determination. InMary Matsuda Gruenewald was a teenage girl who, like other Americans, reacted with horror to the bombing of Pearl Harbor. Yet soon she and her family were amonginnocent people imprisoned by the U.S.

government because of their Japanese ancestry. Little did I know the political storms and social upheavals that would beset my family, tear us away from our home, and confine us in internment camps simply because we looked like the enemy. During World War II Japanese-Americans endured the wholesale violation of our civil and human rights as residents and citizens of the United States.

Looking Like the Enemy is an ambitious study of a tumultuous half-century in Mexico. It is a significant contribution to our understanding of the immigrant experience in the Western Hemisphere and to the burgeoning field of borderlands studies. Looking Like the Enemy (first half) Describe what life was like on Vashon Island.(Looking like the enemy, page 1) Life on Vashon Island was peaceful, quiet, the people of Vashon are friendly and the neighbors were king and understanding, and also helping each other.

Looking Like the Enemy My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese-American Internment Camps (Book): Gruenewald, Mary Matsuda: "When Mary Matsuda Gruenewald was seventeen years old she and her family were evacuated to an internment camp for Japanese-Americans, along with nearlyother people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast.

She tells her story of imprisonment from the. : Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps () by Gruenewald, Mary Matsuda and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices.4/5().

Looking Like the Enemy is the first English-language history of the Japanese experience in Mexico. Japanese citizens were initially lured to Mexico with promises of cheap and productive land in Chiapas.

Many of the promises were false, and the immigrants were forced to fan out across the country, especially to the lands along the US : Jerry García.

Mary Matsuda Gruenewald, Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps 1. Why are interned Japanese Americans referred to as the “silent generation” (p.x). They were referred to as the silent generation because many of them did not speak about their.

This article is within the scope of the WikiProject Japan, a collaborative effort to improve the coverage of Japan-related articles on Wikipedia. If you would like to participate, please visit the project page, where you can join the project, participate in relevant discussions, and see lists of open t time in Japan:May 7, (JST, Reiwa 2).

YOU ARE READING. Looking Like the Enemy (PDF) by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald Non-Fiction. Read Looking Like the Enemy PDF by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald NewSage Press Listen to Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps audiobook by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald Read Online Looking Like the Enemy: My Sto.

APA Citation. Gruenewald, Mary Matsuda. () Looking like the enemy:my story of imprisonment in Japanese-American internment camps Troutdale, Or.: NewSage Press: MLA Citation. Gruenewald, Mary Matsuda. Looking Like The Enemy: My Story Of Imprisonment In Japanese-American Internment Camps.

Spanning generations and wars, Looking Like the Enemy is bold and daring exploration into the often horrifying yet always ironic predicaments faced by American soldiers of Asian descent who fought in World War II, the Korean, and Vietnam Wars.

Breaking a legacy of silence, eighteen veterans share tears, laughter, and gut-wrenching experiences. Start studying Looking Like the Enemy. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Read Looking Like the Enemy PDF by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald NewSage Press Listen to Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps audiobook by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald Read Online Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps ebook by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald Find out Looking Like the Enemy.

Send Email. Recipient(s) will receive an email with a link to 'Review: Looking Like the Enemy: Japanese Mexicans, the Mexican State, and US Hegemony, – by Jerry García' and will not need an account to access the content.

Looking Like the Enemy () Plot. Showing all 0 items Jump to: Summaries. It looks like we don't have any Plot Summaries for this title yet. Be the first to contribute. Just click the "Edit page" button at the bottom of the page or learn more in the Plot Summary submission guide.

Synopsis. It looks like we don't have a Synopsis for this title. A review of Looking Like the Enemy: My Story of Imprisonment in Japanese American Internment Camps by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald. The review briefly places the book in historical and intertextual context, and makes the case that Gruenewald s special contribu\ tion is in its depiction of the psychological experience of the internment in an.

Looking Like the Enemy (The Young Reader's Edition) View larger image. By: Mary captures the emotional and psychological essence of what it was like to grow up in the midst of this profound dislocation, questioning her Japanese and her American heritage.

Book Details Book Quality: Publisher Quality ISBN Looking Like the Enemy, by Mary Matsuda Gruenewald, is a very inspirational book about how a family's faith in God and in each other can get them through the toughest of times.

Many of the books I have read focus on the battles in the Eastern hemisphere against forces of pure evil, but stories that focus on the home front, and more specifically.

Looking Like the Enemy | The author at 16 years old was evacuated with her family to an internment camp for Japanese Americans, along withother people of Japanese ancestry living on the West Coast.

She faced an indefinite sentence behind barbed wire in crowded, primitive camps. From my earliest memories," she writes in her new memoir, Looking Like the Enemy, "I had been both. I grew up playing hopscotch and jacks, learning kendo and ikebana.

I studied U.S. history at school and Japanese on Saturday. For breakfast I ate scrambled eggs and .1 Peter German Bible Alphabetical: a adversary alert and around Be devil devour enemy for like lion looking of on prowls roaring seeking self-controlled sober someone spirit the to Your NT Letters: 1 Peter Be sober and self-controlled (1 Pet.

1P iP i Pet) Christian Bible Study Resources, Dictionary, Concordance and Search Tools.Looking Like the Enemy was published by NewSage Press injust in time for Gruenewald's 80th birthday.

Five years later, NewSage's founder and publisher Maureen R. Michelson reworked the text to produce a "Young Reader's Edition" that includes glossaries of vocabulary words and of Japanese words and phrases, discussion questions, and.